Artist Series – Photo Frame Urn – Dark Cherry – B042-XL – 175 cu. in. – 1969 Corvette

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Each urn is hand signed by the artist, James Knake, a professional illustrator/graphic designer with a B.F.A in Illustration from Ringling College of Art & Design.  Read more about James below.

MDF Wood photo frame urn with dark cherry stain and glass front.

Slide-out panel for photo makes it possible to change the photo without disturbing the cremains.  Loads from the back and securely closes with metal screw. 

Outer Dimensions:  8.5″ L x 6″ W x 5.5″ D

Inside Dimensions:  7.5″ x 4.5″ x 5.25″

Photo Size: 5″ x 7″

Capacity: 175 cu. in.

In the 1969 Corvette, small block engine displacement increased from 327 cu in (5.4 L) to 350 cu in (5.7 L), though output remained the same. All other engines and transmission choices remained unchanged from the previous year, though the L30 base engine was now the ZQ3 and the L79 motor was redesignated the L46.[7] All cars featured 8-inch-wide (200 mm) steel wheels (increased from 7 inches). Tire size remained the same, although this was the first year for optional white lettered tires and the last for red striped tires. Carried over from the previous year were seven available rear axle ratios ranging from 2.73 to 4.56. Standard ratio remained 3.08 with automatic and 3.36 with manual transmission. The optional Positraction rear axle, mandated on many engine/gearbox combinations, was installed on more than 95% of the cars. “Stingray” script nameplates appeared on front fenders, now one word, in contrast to the “Sting Ray” name used previously. Exterior door handles were redesigned so the finger plate would actuate the door, eliminating the separate release button. Backup lights were integrated into the inboard taillights, headlight washers were added, and front grilles were made all black. Side mounted exhausts and front fender vent trim were options for this year only. On the inside, revised door panels provided additional shoulder room in the C3’s tighter cabin and headrests became standard. Steering wheel diameter was reduced from 16 to 15 inches to permit easier entry and exit, the ignition switch was moved from the dash to the steering column, and map pockets were added to the dash area in front of the passenger seat. Accounting for 57% of the cars, coupes with their removable roof panels, began a trend of outselling roadsters. An extended production cycle due to a labor dispute increased ’69 volume. This was the last year for the L88 engine and the only year for the ZL1 option, which offered an all-aluminum 427 cu in (7.0 L) big-block engine listed at 430 hp (321 kW). Rare options: ZL1 aluminum block, J56 heavy-duty brakes (115), L88 engine (116), L89 aluminum heads (390).

About the Artist:

James Knake is a professional illustrator/graphic designer with a B.F.A in Illustration from Ringling College of Art & Design. He has had a fascination with cars since he was a young boy. Always playing with car toys and building models. While in high school, he was hanging around with the guys who had Camaros, GTOs, Mustangs, anything fast with a big motor! James became obsessed with Muscle Cars from the 60’s and 70’s. After high school he purchased an old beat up 1967 Pontiac Firebird for $300 and proceeded to spend his time fixing it up and learning on the go. Bodywork, engine rebuilding, electrical systems, you name it. He sold that car years ago, but his love for classic muscle cars continues to this day. Now James has turned his attention to illustrating them. He decided to start painting some of his favorite cars from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s.

To purchase large signed prints visit the website at www.classiccarartist.com. Sizes are 11 x 14 – 16 x 20 – 18 x 24