Artist Series – Photo Frame Urn – Dark Cherry – B042-XL – 175 cu. in. – 1967 Firebird

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Each urn is hand signed by the artist, James Knake, a professional illustrator/graphic designer with a B.F.A in Illustration from Ringling College of Art & Design.  Read more about James below.

MDF Wood photo frame urn with dark cherry stain and glass front.

Slide-out panel for photo makes it possible to change the photo without disturbing the cremains.  Loads from the back and securely closes with metal screw. 

Outer Dimensions:  8.5″ L x 6″ W x 5.5″ D

Inside Dimensions:  7.5″ x 4.5″ x 5.25″

Photo Size: 5″ x 7″

Capacity: 175 cu. in.

The first generation Firebird had characteristic Coke bottle styling shared with its cousin, the Chevrolet Camaro. Announcing a Pontiac styling trend, the Firebird’s bumpers were integrated into the design of the front end, giving it a more streamlined look than the Camaro. The Firebird’s rear “slit” taillights were inspired by the 1966–1967 Pontiac GTO. Both a two-door hardtop and a convertible were offered through the 1969 model year. Originally, the car was a “consolation prize” for Pontiac, which had desired to produce a two-seat sports car based on its original Bansheeconcept car. However, GM feared this would cut into Chevrolet Corvette sales, and gave Pontiac a piece of the “pony car” market through sharing the F-body platform with Chevrolet.

The 1967 base model Firebird came equipped with the Pontiac 230 cu in (3.8 L) SOHC inline-six. Based on the standard Chevrolet 230 cu in (3.8 L) inline-six, it was fitted with a single-barrel carburetor and rated at 165 hp (123 kW).The “Sprint” model six came with a four-barrel carburetor, developing 215 hp (160 kW). Most buyers opted for one of three V8s: the 326 cu in (5.3 L) with a two-barrel carburetor producing 250 hp (190 kW); the four-barrel “HO” (high output) 326, producing 285 hp (213 kW); or the 325 hp (242 kW) 400 cu in (6.6 L) from the GTO. All 1967–1968 400 CI engines had throttle restrictors that blocked the carburetors’ second barrels from fully opening. A “Ram Air” option was also available, providing functional hood scoops, higher flow heads with stronger valve springs, and a hotter camshaft. Power for the Ram Air package was the same as the conventional 400 HO, but peaked at 5,200 RPM.

About the Artist:

James Knake is a professional illustrator/graphic designer with a B.F.A in Illustration from Ringling College of Art & Design. He has had a fascination with cars since he was a young boy. Always playing with car toys and building models. While in high school, he was hanging around with the guys who had Camaros, GTOs, Mustangs, anything fast with a big motor! James became obsessed with Muscle Cars from the 60’s and 70’s. After high school he purchased an old beat up 1967 Pontiac Firebird for $300 and proceeded to spend his time fixing it up and learning on the go. Bodywork, engine rebuilding, electrical systems, you name it. He sold that car years ago, but his love for classic muscle cars continues to this day. Now James has turned his attention to illustrating them. He decided to start painting some of his favorite cars from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s.

To purchase large signed prints visit the website at www.classiccarartist.com. Sizes are 11 x 14 – 16 x 20 – 18 x 24